Sanisera and Sa Nitja archaeological site on Menorca, Spain.

Sanisera and Sa Nitja | Menorca, Spain

On this particular evening, there was a stunning sunset that we enjoyed. The old surrounding ruins, the boat sitting on the calm water and the ruins of the British Tower can all be seen on the horizon in perfect distance from one another, creating a remarkable view. With one shot, I captured this mix of sights that history shaped on the natural port of Sa Nitja. Sanisera and Sa Nitja are now archaeological sites.

Menorca Cavalleria Coastline by the cliffs, Spain.

Cavalleria Coastline | Menorca, Spain

The limestone cliffs of Menorca looked both majestic and peaceful during the morning hours of photography taking with folks from PhotoPills. It was difficult for me to imagine that the Cavalleria Coastline was once a witness of piracy and Roman invasion.

Menorca Cap de Favàritx Parc Natural de S’Albufera des Grau, Spain.

Cap de Favàritx | Menorca, Spain

This setting – Cap de Favàritx is located on the north-east side of Menorca in the “Parc Natural de S’Albufera des Grau”. This part of the coast is known for both sandy beaches and impressive rock formations. The lighthouse in this image is a little difficult to see in the background, but it stands at 47 meters over sea level and it sends the light at a range of 16 nautical miles.

Views on Azenhas do Mar in Sintra, Portugal.

Views on Azenhas do Mar | Portugal

Azenhas do Mar during the sunset, reminded me of images, of such Italian villages as the Cinque Terre or Positano. Though it had a great advantage over it – the area wasn’t very touristic. The often-overlooked small town in the Sintra district, seemed to be undiscovered by photographers and tourists.

Menorca Cliffs - Pont d’en Gil bridge in the evening, Spain.

Pont d’en Gil bridge | Menorca, Spain

When I saw this limestone formation on the Menorca island, I immediately thought that this arch had to have been formed by human hand – this shape could be perfectly used as a guarded gate to an ancient port. In reality, Pont d’en Gil, as it is called in the native language, is a rock formation made fully by the forces of nature.