Mariánské Lázně frescos on Maxim Gorky’s Colonnade.

Frescos | Mariánské Lázně, Czech Republic

Every time you pass through a building that appears like no other, look up! You may discover frescos that grab your attention instantly and that will likely prompt you to want to see them again repeatedly. These newly discovered beauties were decorated on the ceiling of Maxim Gorky’s Colonnade in the Mariánské Lázně spa town in the Czech Republic.

Interior Cathedral of the Resurrection of Christ with modern frescos, Podgorica in Montenegro.

Interior Cathedral of the Resurrection of Christ | Podgorica, Montenegro

When I entered this Cathedral, I expected golden paintings so commonly seen in old Orthodox churches. My expectations though were only slightly correct… To my own surprise, in one of the paintings, I saw illustrations of Marx, Engels, and Tito… rotting in hell. When I saw it, all the puzzles started to fit in place – I was surrounded by paintings of relatively “modern” people who had a great deal of influence on politics and history of Montenegro.

Picture from Athens Greece, showing the impressive symmetry of the atrium at the Zappeion Exhibition Hall.

Zappeion Hall – the atrium | Athens, Greece

This magnificent building is located in the heart of the capital of Greece, surrounded by the National Gardens of Athens. While researching the places to photograph I found a picture of Hall in Zappeion and I couldn’t resist visiting this place as one of the first things to do during this cloudy day in the capital of Greece. The central atrium you see on the photo is of 984 square meters. It has been build on two levels – an Ionic colonnade on the ground floor and pillars on the upper one.

Aljaferia Palace Saragossa, Spain with unique architecture and different styles

Aljaferia Palace | Zaragoza, Spain

The palace is built on foundation walls of a tower house, which dates back to the Moorish Kingdom in the 9th century. The original building has been expanded and altered many times since its establishment during the Taifa Kingdom in 1065. Especially after the recapture by the catholic kings in 1118 its design was remarkably influenced by the immigrating Muslims and their renowned Mudejar style.

German Chancellor Bungalow in Bonn

Chancellor’s Bungalow – Main Room | Bonn, Germany

Now this is how it looked like, the room of power and the heart of the German Government for 35 years until 1999. This is where the Chancellors like Willy Brandt, Helmut Schmidt, and Helmut Kohl lived and received international guests. It’s not hard to imagine the powerful people of politics sitting down in the lounge chairs discussing the fate of their people, is it?

Church of Peace interior in Świdnica, Poland

Church of Peace – Pulpit | Świdnica, Poland

Built in one year completely from wood, the Church of Peace is a result of the fight between Catholicism and evangelists in the 17th century. Its interior is unbelievable beautiful, everything is made from wood and yet it is so colorful and huge. When you’re inside you don’t know where to look first, it has capacity for 5.500 people.

The sculpture “Mother with her Dead Son” of the New Guardhouse in Berlin

New Guardhouse | Berlin, Germany

The sculpture “Mother with her Dead Son” is the central element of the New Guardhouse (Neue Wache) near the Museum Island in Berlin. Since 1993, the New Guardhouse is Germany’s central memorial for the victims of war and dictatorship.

Office of the German Chancellor in the Bungalow in Bonn

The German Chancellor’s Office | Bonn, Germany

That’s the room where the German Chancellors were working from 1964 until 1999. Kind of small, don’t you think? I mean just think about where the American President is working and imagine him sitting in such small office. Anyways, I guess Merkel has a much better office today.

Altarpiece of Veit Stoss in the St. Mary’s Basilica in Kraków. HDR Photo inside the church

Altarpiece of Veit Stoss | Kraków, Poland

The Altarpiece of Veit Stoss is the largest Gothic altarpiece in the world. It was built in the 15th century by the Bavarian sculptor Veit Stoss and comes with a long history. For centuries it was located in the St. Mary’s Basilica in Kraków (Kościół Mariacki) until the Nazis carried it off to Nuremberg during the Second World War.