Dubai Marina day

Dubai Marina

Dubai Marina Dubai, United Arab Emirates When Dubai Marina opened, it was the world’s first man-made marina of this size. Not in “one day Rome was built” as they say. This is also how the Marina was built in phases.   In 2018, the entire marina...
View of the Fanar - Al-Fanar Islamic Cultural Centre; Karat

The Fanar Mosque in Doha | Qatar

the Fanar Mosque in Doha | Qatar Doha, Qatar That “spiral” tower in the photo is the “Fanar” mosque, which is part of the Al-Fanar Islamic Cultural Centre in Doha. It is probably one of the most distinctive buildings in the Qatari capital, but...
Al Khor Port with traditional boats; Qatar

Al Khor Port | Qatar

Al Khor Port | Qatar Al Khor, Qatar Al Khor port is one of the „cradles” of Qatar. It was here that the Al Muhannadi clan, (which consisted of seven Bedouin families), founded the city, which became part of the State of Qatar after 1971. As with Doha, the main...
Venice gondolas standing still; summer in Italy

Gondolas | Venice, Italy

You mainly see gondolas in one place on this Earth – Venice. There is more history and meaning in them that you would probably expect. And there are only a few hundred of them – you can only be a gondolier if you receive a license from the Venice’s guild.

Dubrovnik in Croatia with an old-style boat passing it on the Mediterranean See. The view is from the walls of Dubrovnik.

A colorful boat scene in the Pearl of the Adriatic | Dubrovnik, Croatia

During our walk around the walls of Dubrovnik, I noticed that old-style boat. I realized that it perfectly fits the medieval landscape. Although it appeared to be a touristic boat, that didn’t decrease the charm of the scene. So I pointed the camera with zoom lens to that direction and I shot this photo, which reminds me more of some renaissance painting rather than a picture from a modern Croatian city.

Nyhavn in Copenhagen, Denmark at sunset. The colorful gabled houses during a summers evening

Nyhavn | Copenhagen, Denmark

Originally the branch canal Nyhavn was trenched in 1673 to connect the marketplace Kongens Nytorv to the busy port of Copenhagen in order to boost the trade. Even though Nyhavn never went on to be a big port, due to its limited size and capacity it still led to a lot of businessmen settling down along the promenade. The typical colorful gabled houses were mostly built in the 18th and 19th century and are one of the most important sights in the Danish capital today.